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The Top 5 Cars for Uber Eats Delivery Partners

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Updated 21 Jan 2020Joel Ilton
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Chances are you’ve ordered food through Uber Eats at least once in your lifetime, whether it be recovery food after a big night out or a lazy day in when you don’t feel like cooking.

If you’re looking to earn a bit more cash for a holiday or for bills coming up, becoming an UberEats Delivery partner could be a great way to make use of that free time when you’d just be sitting on the couch scrolling through Instagram.

But what are the vehicle requirements for UberEats, and are their vehicles that are better suited for delivery partners?

First off, you don’t actually need to have a car to become a delivery partner, you can use a bicycle or a scooter to perform deliveries, which is a great way to get paid to do exercise!

Any scooter from 1990 onwards with an engine capacity of 50cc or less can be used, and these can be picked up relatively cheaply, although many will have had a hard life so a full inspection before purchase would be recommended.

The commission UberEats takes is also slightly higher if you are using a bicycle or scooter (35% compared to 30% for vehicle deliveries, as of 1/1/2020)

If you’d prefer to use a vehicle, there are many great options out there, starting with what you have in the garage already. Vehicle requirements for delivery partners are any vehicle produced from 1990 onwards, but you’ll need insurance that exceeds the standard compulsory third party (CTP) included with your rego, whether that be third-party property or full comprehensive.

UberEats drivers need to be able to park in front of restaurants, usually in busy streets, so something small and easy to park would be high on the list. If your vehicle meets these requirements, you’re set to go, as long as you pass the compulsory background checks and any other sign up requirements provided by Uber.

However, if you are looking to purchase a vehicle to carry out deliveries, there are many criteria you should be looking for, including something that's easy to maneuver and park, as well as being comfortable to keep you focussed when you’re working. We have put together a list of the top 5 cars for UberEats delivery below.

1. Toyota Prius Hybrid

Operating a vehicle over long periods doing deliveries can really take its toll on your back pocket with the cost of fuel and maintenance, which is where a hybrid like the Toyota Prius comes in.

Combining a fuel-efficient engine with an electric motor, the Prius uses less fuel than a normal car, as well as putting less wear on things like brakes and engine components which keeps the maintenance costs down.

They are also relatively comfortable to be in for long periods of time meaning you can work for longer. The downside to the Prius is they tend to hold their value, so purchasing a second-hand one may cost you more than a regular vehicle.

The top repair tasks booked through AutoGuru for the Toyota Prius include front brake pad replacement and spark plug replacement.

2. Toyota Corolla

If a Prius is out of your price range, the Toyota Corolla may be the vehicle for you.

Known for their great reliability as well as being quite inexpensive to service and maintain, the Corolla is a great option for an UberEats delivery vehicle.

Picking up a mid-2000’s model won’t break the bank, leaving more money in your pocket from your deliveries, however it is also worth putting some money aside for repairs if they are needed.

Using data collected after helping thousands of Aussies look after their Toyota Corollas, the most common components that require attention include the ignition coils and front brake pads, so having money aside for these repairs will get you back out on the road and delivering with minimum downtime.

3. Mazda 2

Looking at smaller vehicles than the Corolla or the Prius, the Mazda 2 comes in the smaller hatchback segment which is perfect for around town deliveries as well as ease of parking.

The downside to a smaller vehicle is less comfort, but the reduced fuel consumption from the smaller engine will keep more of the profits available for any maintenance required.

Smaller vehicles tend to be cheaper to maintain and service, as well as cheaper options for tyres and brakes when the time comes to replace them.

Front brake pads are the number one repair for the Mazda 2 on AutoGuru, followed by air conditioning repairs, so it may be worth putting aside some funds from deliveries to handle any repairs needed.

4. Honda Jazz

Another small hatchback, the Honda Jazz ticks all of the boxes for an UberEats delivery partner - cheap to run, reliable and relatively inexpensive to maintain.

They are also surprisingly comfortable and easy to maneuver in city traffic, making them perfect for the constant stop start life the vehicle will be operated in.

Using our service and repair data here at AutoGuru, the most common repairs needed on a Honda Jazz are Ignition Coil replacement and front brake pad replacement.

5. Mazda 3

Moving back up a vehicle size into the midsize category, the Mazda 3 is a great vehicle to jump into, not just for UberEats delivery but for normal day to day commuting as well.

The Mazda 3 tends to be reliable, but can use more fuel and cost more for maintenance due to being larger than the small hatchbacks mentioned above.

Using our servicing and repairs data here at AutoGuru, the most common repairs that are required on the Mazda 3 are front brake pad replacement and engine mount replacement, so it may be wise to budget for these repairs over the life of the vehicle, especially as it will be used for deliveries.

Being your own boss and picking when and how you want to work is a big benefit of becoming an UberEats delivery partner, and using any of the vehicles we have listed above or what you already have in the garage is a great way to get started - and remember, when your vehicle is due for a service or repairs, AutoGuru provides you with instant quotes and quick service, getting you back out on the road and earning money in no time.

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Written ByJoel Ilton

Finding a passion for cars from a young age, Joel carried out work experience as a mechanic whilst at school before starting an apprenticeship after finishing year 12.

After almost 10 years on the tools and in customer service, he moved into the IT realm as a Data Analyst and In-House mechanic at AutoGuru.