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What to Look For When Choosing a Mobile Mechanic

By Denis Doherty on Thursday, 6 December 2018

How did you choose your doctor? Just whip open the Yellow Pages (very old school of you) and pick one that was nearby?

How about your dentist? Just threw some names in a hat and pulled one out?

Of course not. I mean, your health is in these people's hands.

You checked and vetted them thoroughly.

Why would it be any different when it comes to picking a mobile mechanic?

The family motor is likely one of the biggest purchases you’ll make in your lifetime and, perhaps more importantly, it’s the piece of kit used every day to transport you and your loved ones.

Having a car in good condition couldn’t be more important, so why would you trust yours to a fly-by-night operation?

When circumstances conspire to make the convenience of a mobile mechanic the best answer to getting your vehicle maintained and/or repaired, you’ll want to know you’re getting a service delivered from a business that knows their stuff.

So, what should you look for in a mobile mechanic?

1. Are they certified?

It’s the most obvious of questions, but it’s the first thing you’ll want to know.

A qualified mechanic is really the only way to go when it comes to the maintenance of your car.

You could also have a look to see if they are members of any professional organisations or associations.

Membership comes with obligations, so a mechanic with a ticket to a trades group has a better chance of being better quality.

2. What do people think? 

Ask your friends and family for advice and look online for reviews.

If someone you know and trust reports a positive outcome with a mobile mechanic, well, that's worth its weight in gold.

Online reviews are a solid resource too - in our connected world we are not shy about expressing our opinions and a business with plenty of good reviews (the odd duff one is almost always in the mix somewhere) is a good indication of quality.

3. How do they charge?

A good mechanic can diagnose a problem, have a fair idea of the cost of replacement parts and the time needed to get them, and the length of time and cost needed to get the job done.

They can give you a quote that will cover all of this and when the final bill comes in it should come as no shock.

If your mechanic wants to charge you by the hour with no set time frame you can take it as given that you may need a second opinion.

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4. Do they have a website? 

Searching online is the easiest way to find a business offering the services you need.

While it may not be something that separates genuine mechanics from fly-by-night operations, a solid online presence and a decent website gives you the chance to find out details of the business, its services and experience. 

5. Do they accept credit cards?

Any legitimate business loves credit cards.

It means you carry less cash, reducing your security risk, and it creates an easy to follow paper trail which helps when you have to fill out those pesky Business Activity Statements for GST every quarter.

While preferring cash doesn't exclude someone from being a good mechanic, it could be a red flag. 

6. What do they drive?

If it's a Ferrari, you know they must be good at something.

But in reality, a good mobile mechanic will travel with the tools for a range of jobs and most likely turn up in a van with all the equipment on hand to at least start work on your car.

While they are working, have a look at their van.

Are their tools strewn about or is everything locked away in organised storage?

While it's not definitive, a well-organised workspace is a fair pointer to a well-organised worker.

If you’re looking for a high-quality mobile mechanic, look no further than AutoGuru.

We can help you get instant quotes from a range of certified, local and high-quality mobile mechanics, and with easy online booking, it’s almost too easy!

About the author
Denis Doherty learned to drive manuals when his dad took him out on flood-ravaged north-west Queensland roads and put him behind the wheel of the company's Toyota Land Cruiser.

Since then, he has loved cars and the freedom they offer.

Despite knowing better, his first car was a Mitsubishi Sigma, but at least it was the GLX which was modified by motoring writer Peter Wherrett.

He currently drives a 1998 Holden Calais but still wishes he was in his Peugeot 206 GTI180. 

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